Making a difference to the way you think about career.

A History GCSE, a passion for design, a Saturday job in retail. The leap from school to employment can seem huge, and the connection between one and the other is not always obvious.

 Recent research shows:

  • Over one-third of 15-16 year-olds’ career interests lie in just 10 occupations.
  • The typical twenty-first century Briton can expect to work in a dozen or more different jobs across a number of different career areas.
  • Career indecision or unrealism at age 16 leads to later risk of NEET (not in education, employment or training) status and lower earnings.
  • Youth unemployment can lead to increased likelihood of unemployment at a later age; lower earnings potential; and adverse mental and physical health.
  • Over a million young people are unemployed in the UK.
  • Young people need insights into different career options to broaden and raise their expectations.

 

Sources: National Careers Council (2013); Education and Employers Task Force (2012) and (2013); Labour Force Survey (2012); The Work Foundation (2012).

The complexity of today’s economic and social environment brings a new set of challenges for young people. And the world of work has changed – advances in technology; the rise of the knowledge economy and service sector and decline of many semi-skilled jobs; changes to the education and exam system; and new ways of working with an increase in part-time and self-employment, internships and the end of a job for life – all mean the old certainties have gone.

Making decisions at any crossroads in life is difficult. But finding your way when faced with a bewildering range of options – often now equally alien to adults, and at a turbulent time of life is twice as tough. What is more, careers information can be patchy, often only signposting popular routes and effectively limiting young people’s options – after all, you can only aspire to what you know about.

With a focus on people, rather than jobs, icould is a different way to think about career. Designed for 14-24 year-olds, icould takes users’ interests or favourite subjects  as a starting point to explore real-life career videos.

Our personal stories look at the complete picture, showing how varied factors and life events such as exam failure, a year out, teachers and family members, or a particular hobby or interest can all influence career decisions. And through accompanying job information and articles we provide details on all routes at different educational stages, through to the transition to work and beyond. By bringing careers to life, we encourage young people to consider new possibilities and extend their outlook and ambition.

The decisions young people make now can have a lasting impact on their future success and happiness. Who can argue with the importance of that?

See more about what icould offers.