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Angela D

00:00:01 My name's Angela D and I'm a Nurse Specialist Adviser for moving and handling. I work for a group at ... Risk Management, and the title means that I'm a nurse by trade and - but I've gone into a speciality where I'm actually advising staff about how they move and handle patients and loads. Our staff in all sorts of our areas, move other than patients, bits of equipment, could be cameras, could be video stacks in theatres, so we advise them how to do it the safest way. Came into it because I had always been a key worker, link trainer, in the departments that I'd worked in in the Trust before, and I'd always had an interest on staff safety. And so wherever I've gone I've taken on a role of trying to encourage staff to take on safe moves with their patients, so that they're safe and the patients are safe.

00:00:55 It wasn't a direction I immediately thought of. It's something that I tagged on to my normal role as a nursing duty, as a nursing role, it was an extended role that you did. I realised actually when a job came up I was very interested in it, and it was something that I thought maybe I would go into.

00:01:17 I had a very good teacher at school, seems a long time ago, who was very very keen on encouraging us then to think of careers that you could go into, so career advice. And when we had a speaker come in and talk about what she did, she was a Sister on a ward, and she gave a very inspiring talk about what nursing involved, and I never thought of doing anything different. I don't think I ever thought I would be doing it as long as I have, but I've changed my roles quite regularly while I've been doing my nursing career.

00:01:58 I started originally with orthopaedic nursing, which is very much looking at bones and patients that have had muscular problems. I then went on and did my general nursing training, and looked after patients in a general nursing hospital. And I worked then in the community, and worked as a Community Sister for quite some time. Worked in clinics in South Africa, and came back here, and then came back and did a return to nursing course, which was terrifying at the time - back into Addenbrookes. That's where I started doing that.

00:02:32 South Africa different - we were over there at a time when it was Apartheid. The clinic situation that I worked in, it was very much an Apartheid system, the segregation I found extremely difficult, and I - it wasn't something that as a family we dealt with very well. We enjoyed our stay there but we came home in the end. Yes, a difficult situation, and something that you had to get used to, something that you didn't always accept, but it was something you had to deal with because it was the country you were living in at the time.

00:03:10 One of the high points probably is - I came back in, as I say, I did a return to nursing course - to be feeling very confident and competent on a ward once I'd done that to be able to take - take on board all the things a ward can throw at you. And actually not think, I can't deal with this. It actually gives you a huge boost because you think - well , you know, whatever comes into this ward, I'm going to cope with this.

00:03:43 We see patients very very poorly, possibly dying. We see patients that have improved greatly, and we see them leave the Trust. It's lovely. Make the most of your life, do whatever you can when you can do it, because you never know what's round the corner.

00:04:02 ENDS

 

Angela D

Angela D My name's Angela D and I'm a Nurse Specialist Adviser for moving and handling. I work for a group at ... Risk Management, and the title means that I'm a nurse by trade and - but I've gone into a speciality where I'm actually advising staff about how they move and handle patients and loads. Our staff in all sorts of our areas, move other than patients, bits of equipment, could be cameras, could be video stacks in theatres, so we advise them how to do it the safest way. Came into it because I had always been a key worker, link trainer, in the departments that I'd worked in in the Trust before, and I'd always had an interest on staff safety. And so wherever I've gone I've taken on a role of trying to encourage staff to take on safe moves with their patients, so that they're safe and the patients are safe. It wasn't a direction I immediately thought of. It's something that I tagged on to my normal role as a nursing duty, as a nursing role, it was an extended role that you did. I realised actually when a job came up I was very interested in it, and it was something that I thought maybe I would go into. I had a very good teacher at school, seems a long time ago, who was very very keen on encouraging us then to think of careers that you could go into, so career advice. And when we had a speaker come in and talk about what she did, she was a Sister on a ward, and she gave a very inspiring talk about what nursing involved, and I never thought of doing anything different. I don't think I ever thought I would be doing it as long as I have, but I've changed my roles quite regularly while I've been doing my nursing career. I started originally with orthopaedic nursing, which is very much looking at bones and patients that have had muscular problems. I then went on and did my general nursing training, and looked after patients in a general nursing hospital. And I worked then in the community, and worked as a Community Sister for quite some time. Worked in clinics in South Africa, and came back here, and then came back and did a return to nursing course, which was terrifying at the time - back into Addenbrookes. That's where I started doing that. South Africa different - we were over there at a time when it was Apartheid. The clinic situation that I worked in, it was very much an Apartheid system, the segregation I found extremely difficult, and I - it wasn't something that as a family we dealt with very well. We enjoyed our stay there but we came home in the end. Yes, a difficult situation, and something that you had to get used to, something that you didn't always accept, but it was something you had to deal with because it was the country you were living in at the time. One of the high points probably is - I came back in, as I say, I did a return to nursing course - to be feeling very confident and competent on a ward once I'd done that to be able to take - take on board all the things a ward can throw at you. And actually not think, I can't deal with this. It actually gives you a huge boost because you think - well , you know, whatever comes into this ward, I'm going to cope with this. We see patients very very poorly, possibly dying. We see patients that have improved greatly, and we see them leave the Trust. It's lovely. Make the most of your life, do whatever you can when you can do it, because you never know what's round the corner. ENDS  

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Age at filming: 50-60, Employer's name: Addenbrookes Hospital
An influential teacher and an inspirational careers talk from a visiting ward sister helped Angela discover her passion for nursing. Changing roles regularly and working in the UK and South Africa, has kept Angela's interest in nursing alive. Her mantra is 'Make the most of your life, do whatever you can when you can do it'

More information about health services and public health managers and directors

Check out 15 videos about this career


Average Salary
£54,600
Average Weekly Hours
40
Past Unemployment
YearUnemployed
20112%
20122%
Predicted Employment
Top 10 Industries
For This Job
IndustryJobs
Retail trade6,900
Wholesale trade5,661
Specialised construction 2,942
Head offices, etc2,701
Public admin. & defence2,571
Auxiliary  services2,566
Health 2,482
Computer programming, etc2,224
Financial services1,903
Architectural & related1,767
Employment Status
Description

Managers and directors in this unit group plan, organise, direct and co-ordinate the resources and activities of health care providers and purchasers at both district and unit levels.

Qualifications

Entrants require a degree or equivalent qualification, a professional qualification and/or relevant experience. Off- and on-the-job training is provided through management training schemes. The nature of schemes varies between regions and occupational areas.

Tasks
  • Implements policies of the board, ensures statutory procedures are followed, with particular emphasis on patient safety and the management of risk
  • Liaises with health care professionals to determine short and long-term needs and how to meet these objectives within budgetary constraints
  • Oversees the day-to-day management of the unit or service and provides leadership to staff
  • Uses statistical information to monitor performance and assist with planning
  • Negotiates and manages contracts with providers and purchasers of health care services
  • Manages staff, including recruitment, appraisal and development
  • Monitors and reports upon the effectiveness of services with a view to improving the efficiency of health care provision
  • Coordinates the promotion of public health and wellbeing in the actions and policies of public agencies and their social partners
  • Monitors and reports upon the state of public health and wellbeing.
Employment by Region
Gender Balance
M 68% 32% F
Where to go next
Information and statistics for the health and social care sector.Cambridge University HospitalsSector Skills Council for Health Professionals

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