Can't view the video above?

Dan C

00:00:03 My name's Dan C, I'm a Market Analyst for Johnson Matthey's Precious Metal Marketing Group. Basically what we do is we track the global supply and demand of platinum group metals. So the core business for Johnson Matthey is precious metals - platinum, palladium, and rhodium. And they're dug out of the ground in places like South Africa and Russia. Once you've processed that rock, you can make a concentrated solution or powder of the precious metals, and then use that for myriad of different products. This is an example, it's a catalytic converter you might find on a car or van, and the precious metals themselves are coated onto a ceramic block. The exhaust gases will pass through, and the more harmful chemicals in the environment can be cleaned up.

00:00:50 I did Chemistry at University, finished my degree and went on to do a PhD. Also in Chemistry, in a slightly more specialised area. From my PhD, I pretty much decided I didn't want to stay in Academia, that I wanted to move into industry. So that was a - a sort of a critical turning point, I think, for me.

00:01:13 I'd been familiar with Johnson Matthey during my PhD because I'd used some of their products, and saw a job advertised, and went for it in their development laboratories, making catalysts for the oil refining industry. I spent two and a half years in that job, and was sort of itching for a little more wider exposure to the different parts of the business, and the opportunity came up in Market Research, which enables me to cover all the markets that Johnson Matthey do, plus the areas that we don't currently sell into, as well. And throw in a bit of world travel along the way.

00:01:48 I never had a really well-defined career path. The careers advice that I'd got in school was sketchy at best, I would say. So if you'd spoken to me while I was at school, the last thing I would have said I would be doing right now is the job I'm doing right now. I knew I enjoyed Chemistry, and sort of that's why I continued on that track through University, because it's something I found interesting. And I still use it today.

00:02:14 It's difficult to say who would be sort of a single influence or inspiration for me. But I'd probably have to say my parents, for just supporting me through the choices I made during my life. So if I decided I wanted to do something, then they would get behind me a hundred percent. And neither of them are scientists - my Dad's an engineer, Mum's a language teacher - so they didn't really understand what I could do, or where I was going with the subject. But nonetheless were perfectly happy to get behind me, and back me up on that.

00:02:46 I think the work/life balance here that I have is very good. I joined Royston Rugby Club three years ago, and barring the occasional injury that I seem to pick up now I'm getting a bit older, that's still good fun. That's something I hadn't done since I'd been at school. While I'd been at University I hadn't played rugby for a long time, but the guys down here are dead welcoming, and it's nice to be able to walk around town and see people that aren't from Johnson Matthey. When people work here it's easy to see the only people you know are actually your work colleagues as well.

00:03:15 If I could retire early, I'd love to move to New Zealand and run a vineyard. I went to visit a friend down there earlier this year, and took a camper van touring around for two weeks after we'd seen him, and just had the best time. So it's just a really nice place to be really.

00:03:37 Success - it depends how you measure it. If you're liked and respected for what you do and what you can offer other people, and you are able to help people whenever you can with their jobs, and they come to you for advice, then I think that's pretty successful in itself. It's always nice to move on and be recognised formally for the things that you can do, but there are other ways of measuring it, I think, as well.

00:04:02 ENDS

Dan C

Dan C My name's Dan C, I'm a Market Analyst for Johnson Matthey's Precious Metal Marketing Group. Basically what we do is we track the global supply and demand of platinum group metals. So the core business for Johnson Matthey is precious metals - platinum, palladium, and rhodium. And they're dug out of the ground in places like South Africa and Russia. Once you've processed that rock, you can make a concentrated solution or powder of the precious metals, and then use that for myriad of different products. This is an example, it's a catalytic converter you might find on a car or van, and the precious metals themselves are coated onto a ceramic block. The exhaust gases will pass through, and the more harmful chemicals in the environment can be cleaned up. I did Chemistry at University, finished my degree and went on to do a PhD. Also in Chemistry, in a slightly more specialised area. From my PhD, I pretty much decided I didn't want to stay in Academia, that I wanted to move into industry. So that was a - a sort of a critical turning point, I think, for me. I'd been familiar with Johnson Matthey during my PhD because I'd used some of their products, and saw a job advertised, and went for it in their development laboratories, making catalysts for the oil refining industry. I spent two and a half years in that job, and was sort of itching for a little more wider exposure to the different parts of the business, and the opportunity came up in Market Research, which enables me to cover all the markets that Johnson Matthey do, plus the areas that we don't currently sell into, as well. And throw in a bit of world travel along the way. I never had a really well-defined career path. The careers advice that I'd got in school was sketchy at best, I would say. So if you'd spoken to me while I was at school, the last thing I would have said I would be doing right now is the job I'm doing right now. I knew I enjoyed Chemistry, and sort of that's why I continued on that track through University, because it's something I found interesting. And I still use it today. It's difficult to say who would be sort of a single influence or inspiration for me. But I'd probably have to say my parents, for just supporting me through the choices I made during my life. So if I decided I wanted to do something, then they would get behind me a hundred percent. And neither of them are scientists - my Dad's an engineer, Mum's a language teacher - so they didn't really understand what I could do, or where I was going with the subject. But nonetheless were perfectly happy to get behind me, and back me up on that. I think the work/life balance here that I have is very good. I joined Royston Rugby Club three years ago, and barring the occasional injury that I seem to pick up now I'm getting a bit older, that's still good fun. That's something I hadn't done since I'd been at school. While I'd been at University I hadn't played rugby for a long time, but the guys down here are dead welcoming, and it's nice to be able to walk around town and see people that aren't from Johnson Matthey. When people work here it's easy to see the only people you know are actually your work colleagues as well. If I could retire early, I'd love to move to New Zealand and run a vineyard. I went to visit a friend down there earlier this year, and took a camper van touring around for two weeks after we'd seen him, and just had the best time. So it's just a really nice place to be really. Success - it depends how you measure it. If you're liked and respected for what you do and what you can offer other people, and you are able to help people whenever you can with their jobs, and they come to you for advice, then I think that's pretty successful in itself. It's always nice to move on and be recognised formally for the things that you can do, but there are other ways of measuring it, I think, as well. ENDS

Embed Code

<!-- START YOUTUBE EMBED CODE --><div class="youtube_container"><iframe width="100%" height="360" id="youtube_iframe_N0zXvixqcM4" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/N0zXvixqcM4?showinfo=0&rel=0&wmode=transparent&autohide=1&autoplay=1" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></div><!-- END YOUTUBE EMBED CODE -->

View the full version of this video

Email to a friend

You must log in to share this video with a friend.

Age at filming: 26-35, Employer's name: Johnson Matthey
Dan C is a Market Analyst for Johson Matthey's Precious Metal Marketing Group. He tracks the global supply of the platinum group metals which Johnson Mathey use to manufacture their products. This involves going to places like South Africa and Russia where the metals are dug out of the ground. Dan studied chemistry at school and university, because he enjoyed the subject rather than with a particular career in mind. After he'd done his PhD he realised he didn't want to become an academic so he went to work for Johnson Matthey.

More information about management consultants and business analysts

Check out 5 videos about this career


Average Salary
£39,520
Average Weekly Hours
39
Past Unemployment
YearUnemployed
20113%
20123%
Predicted Employment
Top 10 Industries
For This Job
IndustryJobs
Head offices, etc23,245
Architectural & related15,146
Public admin. & defence12,728
Legal & accounting 12,298
Health 10,901
Other professional10,405
Retail trade6,379
Membership organisations6,078
Auxiliary  services5,898
Education5,746
Employment Status
Description

Jobholders in this unit group advise industrial, commercial and other establishments on a variety of management and business-related matters to assist in the formulation of financial and business policies in order to maximise growth or improve business performance.

Qualifications

Entry is most common with a degree or equivalent qualification, but is possible with other academic qualifications. Professional qualifications are available and will be a requirement in some areas.

Tasks
  • Assesses the functions, objectives and requirements of the organisation seeking advice
  • Identifies problems concerned with business strategy, policy, organisation, procedures, methods and markets
  • Determines the appropriate method of data collection and research methodology, analyses and interprets information gained and formulates and implements recommendations and solutions
  • Advises governments, commercial enterprises, organisations and other clients in light of research findings
  • Runs workshops, and addresses seminars, conferences and the media to present results of research activity or to express professional views.
Employment by Region
Gender Balance
M 56% 44% F
Where to go next
Useful information about the manufacturing sectorSector Skills Council for Science, Engineering and Manufacturing Technologies

More information about biological scientists and biochemists

Check out 14 videos about this career


Average Salary
£39,000
Average Weekly Hours
38
Past Unemployment
YearUnemployed
20115%
20123%
Predicted Employment
Top 10 Industries
For This Job
IndustryJobs
Computer programming, etc11,834
Head offices, etc5,757
Architectural & related4,750
Education4,185
Specialised construction 4,151
Retail trade3,399
Public admin. & defence3,095
Wholesale trade2,697
Legal & accounting 2,507
Health 2,357
Employment Status
Description

Biological scientists and biochemists examine and investigate the morphology, structure, chemistry and physical characteristics of living organisms, including their inter-relationships, environments and diseases.

Qualifications

Entrants usually possess a degree. Entry may also be possible with an appropriate BTEC/SQA award, an Advanced GNVQ/GSVQ Level III, or other academic qualifications. Further specialist training is provided on the job. Some employers may expect entrants to gain professional qualifications.

Tasks
  • Studies the physical and chemical form, structure, composition and function of living organisms
  • Identifies and studies the chemical substances, including microbial infections, involved in physiological processes and the progress of disease
  • Performs tests to study physiological and pathological characteristics within cells and other organisms
  • Researches the effects of internal and external environmental factors on the life processes and other functions of living organisms
  • Observes the structure of communities of organisms in the laboratory and in their natural environment
  • Advises farmers, medical staff and others, on the nature of field crops, livestock and produce and on the treatment and prevention of disease
  • Monitors the distribution, presence and behaviour of plants, animals and aquatic life, and performs other scientific tasks related to conservation not performed by jobholders in MINOR GROUP 214: Conservation and Environment Professionals.
Employment by Region
Gender Balance
M 76% 24% F
Where to go next
Useful information about the manufacturing sectorSector Skills Council for Science, Engineering and Manufacturing Technologies

The tag map below allows you to explore some of the many stories here on icould.

View HTML tag cloud View Flash tag cloud

Dan C's tag map


Adobe Flash Player required

Adobe Flash Player

You need Adobe Flash Player in order to view this content.

Download Adobe Flash Player