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Jane R

00:00:03 My name is Jane R and I'm Leadership Coach at Cambridge University Hospitals, Addenbrookes Hospital. My role is around organisational development. Everyday language - organisational development is making things better, doing the best that we possibly can,. And that usually involves the people who are providing that care. We know what's wrong with the service that we provide, and all we need is someone to ask us - what do you need to do to change it to make it better?

00:00:35 My career has followed a few steps, so it wasn't a leap straight over to leadership - being a leadership coach. It was a gradual thing, each step took me to a different place, and then the next step followed naturally on from that.

00:00:51 Well I always wanted to be a nurse, and at school I knew I was going to be a nurse, so I think I probably got a big tick next to Jane's name around careers advice, she wants to be a nurse. I think the caring side of nursing appealed to me, and I thought I would be a good nurse. And I could do that. And I went to Edinburgh University and I did a Nursing Studies degree, which was quite unusual at that time. Then I became involved in clinical audit, which is about looking at the care that we do provide, and comparing it to research and best practice to see how it compares. And then making changes if we need to.

00:01:28 And then moved into the service improvement team, around improving the care that they provide for patients. So although I'm not providing clinical care myself now, I still see the patient at the end of everything that I do.

00:01:46 The thing that motivated me into being a nurse was helping people and working with people. And that still remains here. I like to work independently, project management, I'm very organised. I have to be organised, I've got two small boys.

00:02:05 The job that I have fits in with my work/life balance with my family life. While I'm at work I'm completely committed to work, but I have got a life outside work. For me it's been fantastic to be able to carry on working and have a family, and not feel too guilty about either part of my life.

00:02:27 There've been lots of high points. Getting into nursing school, qualifying as a nurse, qualifying as a midwife, delivering the first baby on my own as a - you know, as a qualified midwife. Having work published in journals and presenting at conferences to spread the word about what we're doing here to help other people. Loads - lots and lots of high points.

00:02:51 The advantages of working in the NHS are that there are lots of different opportunities, and lots of different ways of finding out about the NHS. You can get temporary work in the bank and try out working in different departments to get a feel of what it's really like to work in a hospital and the different types of jobs that are available.

00:03:14 If I'd been fixed here I would still be a midwife, which might be fine, but I think it probably wasn't for me. I'm not saying that everyone wants to change their career halfway through, but keep your eyes open and progress is made, we would want progress to be made.

00:03:32 My career has taught me to try and be positive. It isn't always easy to be positive and think we can do something, I could do something about that. But what my career has taught me is that we should try.

00:03:46 ENDS

 

Jane R

Jane R My name is Jane R and I'm Leadership Coach at Cambridge University Hospitals, Addenbrookes Hospital. My role is around organisational development. Everyday language - organisational development is making things better, doing the best that we possibly can,. And that usually involves the people who are providing that care. We know what's wrong with the service that we provide, and all we need is someone to ask us - what do you need to do to change it to make it better? My career has followed a few steps, so it wasn't a leap straight over to leadership - being a leadership coach. It was a gradual thing, each step took me to a different place, and then the next step followed naturally on from that. Well I always wanted to be a nurse, and at school I knew I was going to be a nurse, so I think I probably got a big tick next to Jane's name around careers advice, she wants to be a nurse. I think the caring side of nursing appealed to me, and I thought I would be a good nurse. And I could do that. And I went to Edinburgh University and I did a Nursing Studies degree, which was quite unusual at that time. Then I became involved in clinical audit, which is about looking at the care that we do provide, and comparing it to research and best practice to see how it compares. And then making changes if we need to. And then moved into the service improvement team, around improving the care that they provide for patients. So although I'm not providing clinical care myself now, I still see the patient at the end of everything that I do. The thing that motivated me into being a nurse was helping people and working with people. And that still remains here. I like to work independently, project management, I'm very organised. I have to be organised, I've got two small boys. The job that I have fits in with my work/life balance with my family life. While I'm at work I'm completely committed to work, but I have got a life outside work. For me it's been fantastic to be able to carry on working and have a family, and not feel too guilty about either part of my life. There've been lots of high points. Getting into nursing school, qualifying as a nurse, qualifying as a midwife, delivering the first baby on my own as a - you know, as a qualified midwife. Having work published in journals and presenting at conferences to spread the word about what we're doing here to help other people. Loads - lots and lots of high points. The advantages of working in the NHS are that there are lots of different opportunities, and lots of different ways of finding out about the NHS. You can get temporary work in the bank and try out working in different departments to get a feel of what it's really like to work in a hospital and the different types of jobs that are available. If I'd been fixed here I would still be a midwife, which might be fine, but I think it probably wasn't for me. I'm not saying that everyone wants to change their career halfway through, but keep your eyes open and progress is made, we would want progress to be made. My career has taught me to try and be positive. It isn't always easy to be positive and think we can do something, I could do something about that. But what my career has taught me is that we should try. ENDS  

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Age at filming: 36-45, Employer's name: Addenbrookes Hospital
Jane's career in nursing has always been driven by her love of helping people. She has worked in roles as varied as midwife through to her current position as leadership coach, and with two young sons she really values the work life balance this job allows. She is well suited to her role as it allows her to combine her skills of organisation and project management with her ability to work well independently.

More information about health care practice managers

Check out 1 video about this career


Average Salary
£45,240
Average Weekly Hours
40
Past Unemployment
YearUnemployed
20113%
20122%
Predicted Employment
Top 10 Industries
For This Job
IndustryJobs
Food & beverage services 5,610
Retail trade2,722
Accommodation1,768
Real estate 1,542
Services to buildings1,131
Other personal service 1,078
Sport & recreation947
Employment activities904
Sale of motor vehicles 688
Agriculture, etc631
Employment Status
Description

Healthcare practice managers plan, organise, direct and co-ordinate the work and resources of medical, dental and other types of healthcare practice, including veterinary practices.

Qualifications

There are no pre-set entry requirements. Candidates are recruited with a variety of academic qualifications or with relevant experience. Professional qualifications are available and are required for certain posts.

Tasks
  • Plans work schedules, assigns tasks and delegates responsibilities of practice staff
  • Oversees staff training and monitors training needs
  • Takes responsibility for health and safety matters within the practice
  • Negotiates contracts for services with other health care providers and purchasers
  • Maintains patient files on medical history, consultations made and treatment undertaken and/or drugs prescribed
  • Organises duty rosters for professional and support staff in practice
  • Takes responsibility for stock control of practice equipment, drugs etc.
  • Liaises with relevant outside organisations (e.g. NHS trust, PCT, social services, drug companies, professional bodies)
  • Responsible for budgeting, pricing and accounting activities within the practice.
Employment by Region
Gender Balance
M 52% 48% F
Where to go next
Cambridge University HospitalsSector Skills Council for Health Professionals

More information about vocational and industrial trainers and instructors

Check out 22 videos about this career


Average Salary
£31,720
Average Weekly Hours
39
Past Unemployment
YearUnemployed
20115%
20124%
Predicted Employment
Top 10 Industries
For This Job
IndustryJobs
Wholesale trade13,994
Retail trade13,864
Auxiliary  services13,847
Public admin. & defence12,736
Head offices, etc9,553
Employment activities6,809
Real estate 6,256
Financial services6,083
Health 6,024
Services to buildings5,940
Employment Status
Description

Vocational and industrial trainers provide instruction in manual, manipulative and other vocational skills and advise on, plan and organise vocational instruction within industrial, commercial and other establishments.

Qualifications

No formal educational qualifications are required for entry, although most entrants have qualified in some other area of work and will require a Certificate in Training Practice. Professional qualifications are available from the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. NVQs/SVQs in Training and Development are available at Levels 3, 4 and 5.

Tasks
  • Assesses training requirements and prepares lectures, demonstrations and study aids
  • Supervises trainee development, assists trainees with difficulties and prepares regular progress reports on each trainee for management
  • Arranges work experience and instructional visits for trainees
  • Plans curriculum and rota of staff duties and updates or amends them in light of developments
  • Advises on training programmes and discusses progress or problems with staff and trainees
  • Devises general and specialised training courses in response to particular needs.
Employment by Region
Gender Balance
M 53% 47% F
Where to go next
Cambridge University HospitalsSector Skills Council for Health Professionals

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