Sarah B - Sales and Marketing Manager

Can't view the video above?

Sarah B

00:02 My name is Sarah B and I’m the sales and marketing manager at Glengoyne distillery.

00:06 My job involves basically promoting Glengoyne as a world-class visitor attraction and encouraging as many visitors to come and learn about whisky. Oh it’s a really enjoyable job and you get to work with people from all over the world.

00:18 When I was at school there were subjects that I really enjoyed and there were subjects that I just didn’t particularly enjoy or didn’t do particularly well at so I kind of focussed on the things that I could do well and so I did my highers and then went on to the sixth year studies. I found that I liked languages and I was good at it so I kind of stuck to the subjects I enjoyed doing.

00:37 I think the one area I think is with maths, that I felt that I maybe could, I didn’t, I didn’t do higher maths, I chose to do Italian instead of maths and because I enjoyed languages, I felt it was fine for me just to focus on the language side of things and other subjects that I enjoyed, whereas because I didn’t particularly like maths, I felt that I could get away with not having to do that because I wanted to do languages. Whereas now I wish that I had maybe had done higher maths, just so I could have done it and really improved a little bit.

01:06 I went to Strathclyde University and studied international business and modern languages and it was a five year course, which involved spending one year in France, which was fantastic and so I spent one year, my fourth year, at a university, a business school in France and then came back to do my final honours year.

01:25 My dad is a sales manager for a car company and my mum is a teacher, a head teacher. So they were, they never pushed me into going into university, but as I say, it was just that seemed to be a natural kind of course of what I was to do but I didn’t feel there was any pressure from my parents to have to go to university.

01:42 I think university was always in my plans, probably from high school onwards, you know, it was clear I was kind of, I think most of the people that I went to school with were encouraged to go to university or, or college or that’s what you’re taking, working towards. I don’t think when I was at school there was much talk of not going to college and university, it was all kind of about following on from school into another course of future education.

02:05 Well I worked at Glengoyne as a tour guide, when I was a student, when I was at university and then, when I graduated, a position became available for a full-time position in marketing and that’s how I got the job, having worked as a tour guide before that.

02:20 I mean university education’s been a huge help, in the fact that getting you to do presentations, working to deadlines, having to do, having to write, you know, dissertations and essays, things like that, have helped. At the time you don’t really see how this is ever going to be applicable in your career, but it’s only now that I can see that, you know, having had that background, it’s been really helpful to work to deadlines, as I say, and you know, just even working with other people as well, cos you have to work in a lot of groups at university and it does help you to work in a team, when you come in to, when you work here as well.

02:52 Going to university is not the be all and everything. I think that it’s gaining experience throughout life that is really important. Quite a few of my friends at school, who weren’t particularly academic or just didn’t enjoy studying, felt that they had to go on to college or university and then they ended up, you know, not finishing that course and they felt they’d maybe wasted some time, where they could have been, you know, if they’d gone into a job and worked their way up or got some experience in other areas, that that would have been more useful for them.

03:20 What’s really nice about working for Ian Macleod Distillers, the owners of Glengoyne is that they’re quite a small company but they are forward-thinking and, and they give you lots of opportunities to work on various different projects, so you’re not just kind of stuck to doing the one job every day.

03:34 I don’t think I can point kind of pick out one particular turning point in my life, I think that my, I feel that going to school and then going to university and then working here and then getting through to a job here, all just kind of worked, was quite a natural progression, I don’t think there’s any point that there was one decision I made or anything that suddenly kind of turned my life around. I think that it was all just quite a natural, natural progression, ending up here.

03:57 END

Sarah B

Sarah B My name is Sarah B and I’m the sales and marketing manager at Glengoyne distillery. My job involves basically promoting Glengoyne as a world-class visitor attraction and encouraging as many visitors to come and learn about whisky. Oh it’s a really enjoyable job and you get to work with people from all over the world. When I was at school there were subjects that I really enjoyed and there were subjects that I just didn’t particularly enjoy or didn’t do particularly well at so I kind of focussed on the things that I could do well and so I did my highers and then went on to the sixth year studies. I found that I liked languages and I was good at it so I kind of stuck to the subjects I enjoyed doing. I think the one area I think is with maths, that I felt that I maybe could, I didn’t, I didn’t do higher maths, I chose to do Italian instead of maths and because I enjoyed languages, I felt it was fine for me just to focus on the language side of things and other subjects that I enjoyed, whereas because I didn’t particularly like maths, I felt that I could get away with not having to do that because I wanted to do languages. Whereas now I wish that I had maybe had done higher maths, just so I could have done it and really improved a little bit. I went to Strathclyde University and studied international business and modern languages and it was a five year course, which involved spending one year in France, which was fantastic and so I spent one year, my fourth year, at a university, a business school in France and then came back to do my final honours year. My dad is a sales manager for a car company and my mum is a teacher, a head teacher. So they were, they never pushed me into going into university, but as I say, it was just that seemed to be a natural kind of course of what I was to do but I didn’t feel there was any pressure from my parents to have to go to university. I think university was always in my plans, probably from high school onwards, you know, it was clear I was kind of, I think most of the people that I went to school with were encouraged to go to university or, or college or that’s what you’re taking, working towards. I don’t think when I was at school there was much talk of not going to college and university, it was all kind of about following on from school into another course of future education. Well I worked at Glengoyne as a tour guide, when I was a student, when I was at university and then, when I graduated, a position became available for a full-time position in marketing and that’s how I got the job, having worked as a tour guide before that. I mean university education’s been a huge help, in the fact that getting you to do presentations, working to deadlines, having to do, having to write, you know, dissertations and essays, things like that, have helped. At the time you don’t really see how this is ever going to be applicable in your career, but it’s only now that I can see that, you know, having had that background, it’s been really helpful to work to deadlines, as I say, and you know, just even working with other people as well, cos you have to work in a lot of groups at university and it does help you to work in a team, when you come in to, when you work here as well. Going to university is not the be all and everything. I think that it’s gaining experience throughout life that is really important. Quite a few of my friends at school, who weren’t particularly academic or just didn’t enjoy studying, felt that they had to go on to college or university and then they ended up, you know, not finishing that course and they felt they’d maybe wasted some time, where they could have been, you know, if they’d gone into a job and worked their way up or got some experience in other areas, that that would have been more useful for them. What’s really nice about working for Ian Macleod Distillers, the owners of Glengoyne is that they’re quite a small company but they are forward-thinking and, and they give you lots of opportunities to work on various different projects, so you’re not just kind of stuck to doing the one job every day. I don’t think I can point kind of pick out one particular turning point in my life, I think that my, I feel that going to school and then going to university and then working here and then getting through to a job here, all just kind of worked, was quite a natural progression, I don’t think there’s any point that there was one decision I made or anything that suddenly kind of turned my life around. I think that it was all just quite a natural, natural progression, ending up here. END

Embed Code

<!-- START YOUTUBE EMBED CODE --><div class="youtube_container"><iframe width="100%" height="360" id="youtube_iframe_iMmSeGBdyO8" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/iMmSeGBdyO8?showinfo=0&rel=0&wmode=transparent&autohide=1&autoplay=1" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></div><!-- END YOUTUBE EMBED CODE -->

View the short version of this video

Email to a friend

You must log in to share this video with a friend.

About Sarah B

Age at filming: 26-35, Employer's name: Glengoyne Distillery
Sarah B is Sales and Marketing Manager at Glengoyne Distillery. She promotes the distillery as a visitor attraction. This came from her student summer job as tour guide.

More information about marketing and sales directors

Data powered by LMI For All

Check out 15 videos about this career


Average Salary
£71,760
Average Weekly Hours
40
Past Unemployment
YearUnemployed
20112%
20122%
Predicted Employment
Future Employment Chart
Top 10 Industries
For This Job
IndustryJobs
Retail trade23,163
Wholesale trade19,004
Specialised construction 9,878
Head offices, etc9,067
Public admin. & defence8,631
Auxiliary  services8,613
Health 8,333
Computer programming, etc7,466
Financial services6,390
Architectural & related5,930
Employment Status
Employment Status Chart
Description

Marketing and sales directors plan, organise and direct market research and formulate and implement an organisation’s marketing and sales policies.

Qualifications

Entry is generally via career progression from related occupations (e.g. Marketing Manager, Sales Manager). Entrants to the professional qualifications of the Chartered Institute of Marketing require GCSEs/S grades, A levels/H grades, a BTEC/SQA award, a degree or equivalent qualification and/or relevant experience.

Tasks
  • Liaises with other senior staff to determine the range of goods or services to be sold
  • Discusses employer’s or clients’ requirements, plans and monitors surveys and analyses of customers’ reactions to products
  • Examines and analyses sales figures, advises on and monitors marketing campaigns and promotional activities
  • Controls the recruitment and training of staff
  • Produces and/or assesses reports and recommendations concerning marketing and sales strategies.
Employment by Region
Regional Employment Chart
Gender Balance
M 68% 32% F
Skills Chart
Where to go next
Glengoyne DistilleryThe Sector Skills Council for Food and DrinkInformation and Statistics relating to the Food and Drink Manufacturing Industry

View HTML tag cloud View Flash tag cloud

Explore related tags


Adobe Flash Player required

Adobe Flash Player

You need Adobe Flash Player in order to view this content.

Download Adobe Flash Player

Related Content