Can't view the video above?

Tom D

00:00:03 My name’s Tom D, I'm a FundsNetwork Sales Associate. My job basically involves speaking and communicating with Financial Advisers, and selling them the various investment products that FundsNetwork offers.

00:00:15 The most interesting thing is every day is different – or pretty much every hour is different. I'm speaking with the public every minute of every day really and, as we all know, the public are quite interesting people. So that makes my role interesting. There's good satisfaction at the end. Obviously if they decide to use your products. Not so satisfying if they don’t. But yeah, it’s just the variety, and you’re consistently learning.

00:00:39 Started off with – my sister actually worked - works for the company. I done two years at University and I have – I set myself aside for a year out in industry, because I didn’t have a clue really what I wanted to do. Sold time shares for a little bit, and then obviously that – found out what the company was actually all about, so I decided to move on from the pretty swiftly.

00:01:03 Didn’t have complete confidence in what I was selling, so I thought I can’t carry on doing this. And I questioned whether I’d actually buy one myself. I thought if I wouldn’t, then how am I supposed to sell it to somebody else? Even really negative experiences you have - where you’re almost told to sit down, and look you need to sell X amount or whatever – it toughens you up, which is what I needed at the time, and I don’t regret it at all. But it just wasn't for me.

00:01:30 I actually moved – well hypothetically moved - to Canada, with the thoughts of staying over there. So I took a bit of time out over there deciding if that's what I wanted. I've got relatives over in Canada, and I really like the way of life and everything about Canada, so I thought – is this for me? Weighed it up. It wasn't an easy decision, but I thought maybe come and learn my industry in the UK first, before trying to apply it in a country that was new to me as well.

00:01:57 A defining moment for me personally was kind of the decision to come back from Canada. Looking back I'm quite proud of that moment, to do it. I think - not that I was struggled, but I think it was a wise decision to make. It was probably one of the only decision I've made sensibly rather than with my heart, and it made quite a big difference.

00:02:15 When you’re young you don’t really know what you want to do. It’s pretty rare for somebody to have the same thing in their mind consistently. There were a few main careers that – well careers I say, use the term loosely I suppose – but a few ideas I thought would be an ideal job. But as you get older and become slightly more realistic, my thoughts changed slightly. I remember wanting to be a professional golfer in America to a Club Rep in Ibiza.

00:02:44 Always wanted to go to University, obviously it’s encouraged internally within the school. But everyone that I kind of spoke to suggested it and recommended it, and I just thought – get to Uni, it gives me three or four years to kinda get my head round, graft a little bit, move out and decide on where I wanted to go.

00:03:02 I always thought sales, or something very similar to sales. Always kind of wanted to represent a company, whether that was sales or marketing or some kind of PR. From those industries I kind of thought sales was going to be the most rewarding, because if you’re good at it you’re going to sell, and your figures won’t lie.

00:03:20 I joined as a temp again, which is pretty much the only way into the company at the time. Back in exactly the same role, with the same people. So it was like I’d never been away as such, and I took the time to kinda think about what I actually want to do here. Fidelity’s a great name, stick with it, and then look at different areas within the company where I can really push on, and areas of interest for me.

00:03:43 I didn’t think I’d be doing this job this early in my career. I don’t really think about the future too much, but I just kinda didn’t think it – this is like my career now, in my eyes – so I didn’t think I’d be in my career job at 24 really, but it’s obviously a good thing that I am.

00:03:59 ENDS

 

Tom D

Tom D My name’s Tom D, I'm a FundsNetwork Sales Associate. My job basically involves speaking and communicating with Financial Advisers, and selling them the various investment products that FundsNetwork offers. The most interesting thing is every day is different – or pretty much every hour is different. I'm speaking with the public every minute of every day really and, as we all know, the public are quite interesting people. So that makes my role interesting. There's good satisfaction at the end. Obviously if they decide to use your products. Not so satisfying if they don’t. But yeah, it’s just the variety, and you’re consistently learning. Started off with – my sister actually worked - works for the company. I done two years at University and I have – I set myself aside for a year out in industry, because I didn’t have a clue really what I wanted to do. Sold time shares for a little bit, and then obviously that – found out what the company was actually all about, so I decided to move on from the pretty swiftly. Didn’t have complete confidence in what I was selling, so I thought I can’t carry on doing this. And I questioned whether I’d actually buy one myself. I thought if I wouldn’t, then how am I supposed to sell it to somebody else? Even really negative experiences you have - where you’re almost told to sit down, and look you need to sell X amount or whatever – it toughens you up, which is what I needed at the time, and I don’t regret it at all. But it just wasn't for me. I actually moved – well hypothetically moved - to Canada, with the thoughts of staying over there. So I took a bit of time out over there deciding if that's what I wanted. I've got relatives over in Canada, and I really like the way of life and everything about Canada, so I thought – is this for me? Weighed it up. It wasn't an easy decision, but I thought maybe come and learn my industry in the UK first, before trying to apply it in a country that was new to me as well. A defining moment for me personally was kind of the decision to come back from Canada. Looking back I'm quite proud of that moment, to do it. I think - not that I was struggled, but I think it was a wise decision to make. It was probably one of the only decision I've made sensibly rather than with my heart, and it made quite a big difference. When you’re young you don’t really know what you want to do. It’s pretty rare for somebody to have the same thing in their mind consistently. There were a few main careers that – well careers I say, use the term loosely I suppose – but a few ideas I thought would be an ideal job. But as you get older and become slightly more realistic, my thoughts changed slightly. I remember wanting to be a professional golfer in America to a Club Rep in Ibiza. Always wanted to go to University, obviously it’s encouraged internally within the school. But everyone that I kind of spoke to suggested it and recommended it, and I just thought – get to Uni, it gives me three or four years to kinda get my head round, graft a little bit, move out and decide on where I wanted to go. I always thought sales, or something very similar to sales. Always kind of wanted to represent a company, whether that was sales or marketing or some kind of PR. From those industries I kind of thought sales was going to be the most rewarding, because if you’re good at it you’re going to sell, and your figures won’t lie. I joined as a temp again, which is pretty much the only way into the company at the time. Back in exactly the same role, with the same people. So it was like I’d never been away as such, and I took the time to kinda think about what I actually want to do here. Fidelity’s a great name, stick with it, and then look at different areas within the company where I can really push on, and areas of interest for me. I didn’t think I’d be doing this job this early in my career. I don’t really think about the future too much, but I just kinda didn’t think it – this is like my career now, in my eyes – so I didn’t think I’d be in my career job at 24 really, but it’s obviously a good thing that I am. ENDS  

Embed Code

<!-- START YOUTUBE EMBED CODE --><div class="youtube_container"><iframe width="100%" height="360" id="youtube_iframe_x8f9BxzfSzM" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/x8f9BxzfSzM?showinfo=0&rel=0&wmode=transparent&autohide=1&autoplay=1" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></div><!-- END YOUTUBE EMBED CODE -->

View the short version of this video

Email to a friend

You must log in to share this video with a friend.

Age at filming: Not stated, Employer's name: Fidelity International
Tom D is a Sales Associate for Fidelity. He left his first job selling shares because he didn't have confidence in what he was selling. But after a spell in Canada he moved back to the UK and started again. This time he's much more confident.

More information about financial and accounting technicians

Check out 7 videos about this career


Average Salary
£48,360
Average Weekly Hours
40
Past Unemployment
YearUnemployed
20114%
20124%
Predicted Employment
Top 10 Industries
For This Job
IndustryJobs
Wholesale trade2,606
Retail trade2,581
Auxiliary  services2,578
Public admin. & defence2,371
Head offices, etc1,779
Employment activities1,268
Real estate 1,165
Financial services1,133
Health 1,122
Services to buildings1,106
Employment Status
Description

Financial and accounting technicians work alongside accountants and other financial professionals in managing the financial affairs of organisations.

Qualifications

There are no formal academic requirements. Professional qualifications are available from the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants and the Association of Accounting Technicians. These qualifications can be linked to NVQs/SVQs in Accounting at Levels 2, 3 and 4. Exemptions to professional examinations may be granted to those with certain academic qualifications.

Tasks
  • Maintains profit and loss accounts, budgets, cash flow forecasts and other accounting records
  • Produces, collates and reports financial information for managers
  • Liaises with clients to ensure that payments are made on time and credit limits are not exceeded
  • Ensures invoices and payments are correct and sent out on time
  • Monitors accounting systems to determine accounts are being maintained effectively and provides information on accounting practices to auditors.
Employment by Region
Gender Balance
M 53% 47% F
Where to go next
Fidelity InternationalSector Skills Council for Financial Services

The tag map below allows you to explore some of the many stories here on icould.

View HTML tag cloud View Flash tag cloud

Tom D's tag map


Adobe Flash Player required

Adobe Flash Player

You need Adobe Flash Player in order to view this content.

Download Adobe Flash Player