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Tony S

00:02 My name is Tony S. My job description is Lifeline project manager and I work for Youth Initiatives.

00:09 It involves working with fifteen to eighteen year olds on a personal social development programme. It also involves working with them on a faith aspect and also dealing with issues that arise in different areas in their personal and social life.

00:26 I am a product of Youth Initiative. I, I came here when I was sixteen and from then I volunteered for them. I was never in trouble with the police or didn’t commit any crimes. I was a product because Youth Initiative played soccer on a Sunday and some of the guys that I played soccer with on my Saturday team, also played on the Sunday and through that I got involved. I also did my gap year in Detroit, which was through Youth Initiative and then when I came back from Detroit, I went back into the education system and re-trained, got my business management degree and I, I continued to volunteer for Youth Initiative throughout that time, so in total before I started working for Youth Initiatives, I volunteered for them for about ten years, eleven years.

01:25 I loved school. I had a great relationship with my teachers. Mainly in school I was a sporty person, I liked physical education, I liked PE. I wasn’t very academic in school and now that I have time to reflect upon it, I realise that I wasn’t academic because I just simply didn’t put the time in and didn’t put the study hours in.

01:48 I, I left school with one GCSE originally um and it was in business and I was pretty good with, with, with numbers, so when I was thinking about what should I do as a university degree or what should I do as some sort of career option, I thought well what was I good at, at school and the only thing I was really good at, at school, was either sports or business, so I went back and studied business and finance and then I went uh on to business and finance in further education and then business management at degree level. I worked in a law firm, doing their finance for them um and there’s not really much to explain but it was just working with numbers and trying to, you know, keep the organisation afloat,

02:41 My father’s a plasterer, he’s a builder, my mum is retired. She did work for the health service, she worked for the ambulance service. My brother is also a plasterer and my sister’s a nurse.

02:53 I wanted to be a youth worker because I feel I’ve got the skills to impact young people. Youth Initiatives is, it’s a, it’s an organisation that you’re personal and your work life are very, very integrated together. I’m a firm believer that um volunteers and leaders need to come from their own communities.

03:15 This job is not, it’s a combination of a career choice and a life choice, it’s a lifestyle choice and I’m, I, I’m a Christian man and I believe that this is what I, I think I’m meant to do, is to work with young people. I don’t think I’ll be a youth worker for the rest of my life, I believe that I’ll be in the youth service um in some, in some area. But when I was at school I never honestly thought I would grow up to be a, a youth worker or a youth leader.

03:47 END

Tony S

Tony S My name is Tony S. My job description is Lifeline project manager and I work for Youth Initiatives. It involves working with fifteen to eighteen year olds on a personal social development programme. It also involves working with them on a faith aspect and also dealing with issues that arise in different areas in their personal and social life. I am a product of Youth Initiative. I, I came here when I was sixteen and from then I volunteered for them. I was never in trouble with the police or didn’t commit any crimes. I was a product because Youth Initiative played soccer on a Sunday and some of the guys that I played soccer with on my Saturday team, also played on the Sunday and through that I got involved. I also did my gap year in Detroit, which was through Youth Initiative and then when I came back from Detroit, I went back into the education system and re-trained, got my business management degree and I, I continued to volunteer for Youth Initiative throughout that time, so in total before I started working for Youth Initiatives, I volunteered for them for about ten years, eleven years. I loved school. I had a great relationship with my teachers. Mainly in school I was a sporty person, I liked physical education, I liked PE. I wasn’t very academic in school and now that I have time to reflect upon it, I realise that I wasn’t academic because I just simply didn’t put the time in and didn’t put the study hours in. I, I left school with one GCSE originally um and it was in business and I was pretty good with, with, with numbers, so when I was thinking about what should I do as a university degree or what should I do as some sort of career option, I thought well what was I good at, at school and the only thing I was really good at, at school, was either sports or business, so I went back and studied business and finance and then I went uh on to business and finance in further education and then business management at degree level. I worked in a law firm, doing their finance for them um and there’s not really much to explain but it was just working with numbers and trying to, you know, keep the organisation afloat, My father’s a plasterer, he’s a builder, my mum is retired. She did work for the health service, she worked for the ambulance service. My brother is also a plasterer and my sister’s a nurse. I wanted to be a youth worker because I feel I’ve got the skills to impact young people. Youth Initiatives is, it’s a, it’s an organisation that you’re personal and your work life are very, very integrated together. I’m a firm believer that um volunteers and leaders need to come from their own communities. This job is not, it’s a combination of a career choice and a life choice, it’s a lifestyle choice and I’m, I, I’m a Christian man and I believe that this is what I, I think I’m meant to do, is to work with young people. I don’t think I’ll be a youth worker for the rest of my life, I believe that I’ll be in the youth service um in some, in some area. But when I was at school I never honestly thought I would grow up to be a, a youth worker or a youth leader. END

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Age at filming: 26-35, Employer's name: Belfast Youth Initiatives
Tony S is Lifeline project manager for Youth Initiatives in Belfast - "It involves working with fifteen to eighteen year olds on a personal social development programme". He describes himself as a "product of Youth Initiative. I came here when I was sixteen and from then I volunteered for them." After doing a Business degree, Tony took a gap year in Detroit then came back to work in Belfast. "This job is a combination of a career choice and a life choice, I'm a Christian man and I believe that this is what I think I'm meant to do".

More information about youth and community workers

Check out 20 videos about this career


Average Salary
£29,640
Average Weekly Hours
40
Past Unemployment
YearUnemployed
20116%
20124%
Predicted Employment
Top 10 Industries
For This Job
IndustryJobs
Health 24,834
Social work 11,087
Residential care 7,712
Public admin. & defence3,609
Retail trade2,808
Education1,694
Real estate 1,386
Membership organisations1,167
Services to buildings991
Other personal service 615
Employment Status
Description

Youth and community workers provide support to individuals or groups of individuals through a range of activities or services that aim to encourage participation in social and community life and promote personal and social development.

Qualifications

There are no formal academic entry requirements though a minimum age for appointment between 18 and 21 normally applies. Most qualified youth workers possess an accredited diploma in higher education or postgraduate diploma in youth and community work. A majority of qualifying courses are for people aged over 21 years of age. Background checks including a CRB check are likely to be required.

Tasks
  • Organises social, recreational and educational activities in local community and youth groups
  • Undertakes the day-to-day running of community centres and supervises the activities of part-time and voluntary workers
  • Liaises and supports voluntary workers running groups in village halls, churches, mosques and other places of worship
  • Advises individuals with particular needs or problems through informal discussion, individual counselling or formal group discussion
  • Helps set up credit unions, encourages parents to establish playgroups, works with other groups to find solutions to shared concerns or problems.
Employment by Region
Gender Balance
M 31% 69% F
Where to go next
Youth InitiativesSector Skills Council for Care and Development ProfessionalsAn overview of information for the voluntary sector

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