Writer, Director and Cameraman
Self-employed

Share:

Can't view the video above?


Dishad Husein is a freelance director, cameraman and writer of comedy. When he was at school he had no idea about jobs in the media. He did a degree in science, but spent a lot of his time in the student film and television society. This experience enabled him to get into film school, where he learned the skills he uses today.

Data powered by LMI For All

More information about photographers, audio-visual and broadcasting equipment operators

Check out 14 videos about this career


£30,680
average salary
The UK average salary is £27,011
46
average weekly hours
There are 39 hours in the average working week
43%  female  57%  male
The UK workforce is 47% female and 53% male

Future employment

Description

Workers in this unit group operate and assist with still, cine and television cameras and operate other equipment to record, manipulate and project sound and vision for entertainment, cultural, commercial and industrial purposes.

Qualifications

There are no set academic requirements although entrants usually possess GCSEs/S grades, A levels/H grades and are able to demonstrate proof of pre- entry work experience. A variety of diplomas, degrees and postgraduate qualifications are available. NVQs/SVQs in Photography are available at Levels 2, 3 and 4.

Tasks

  • Selects subject and conceives composition of picture or discusses composition with colleagues
  • Arranges subject, lighting, camera equipment and any microphones
  • Inserts lenses and adjusts aperture and speed settings as necessary
  • Operates scanning equipment to transfer image to computer and manipulates image to achieve the desired effect
  • Photographs subject or follows action by moving camera
  • Takes, records and manipulates digital images and digital video footage
  • Controls transmission, broadcasting and satellite systems for television and radio programmes, identifies and solves related technical problems
  • Checks operation and positioning of projectors, vision and sound recording equipment, and mixing and dubbing equipment
  • Operates equipment to record, edit and play back films and television programmes
  • Manages health and safety issues
  • Operates sound mixing and dubbing equipment to obtain desired mix, level and balance of sound.
Employment by region
Top 10 industries
for this job
IndustryJobs
Sport & recreation10,074
Arts & entertainment 9,076
Education5,378
Services to buildings4,886
Film & music 4,631
Employment activities4,390
Other personal service 3,996
Other professional3,861
Publishing activities3,403
Head offices, etc2,769
Employment status

Where to go next

Fancy winning a day with a TV production team? Enter our new Dream Jobs competition.An interview with Dishad HusainSector Skills Council for Creative MediaInformation and Statistics relating to the Media Sector
Data powered by LMI For All

More information about arts officers, producers and directors

Check out 25 videos about this career


£44,200
average salary
The UK average salary is £27,011
46
average weekly hours
There are 39 hours in the average working week
43%  female  57%  male
The UK workforce is 47% female and 53% male

Future employment

Description

Arts officers, producers and directors assume creative, financial and organisational responsibilities in the production and direction of television and radio programmes, films, stage presentations, content for other media, and the promotion and exhibition of other creative activities.

Qualifications

Entry can be via academic qualifications, BTEC/SQA awards, diplomas or degrees in sector-relevant subjects. Apprenticeships are available at NVQ Levels 2 and 3 in some areas.

Tasks

  • Chooses writers, scripts, technical staff and performers, and assumes overall responsibility for completion of project on time and within budget
  • Directs actors, designers, camera team, sound crew and other production and technical staff to achieve desired effects
  • Breaks script into scenes and formulates a shooting schedule that will be most economical in terms of time, location and sets
  • Prepares rehearsal and production schedule for main events, design of sets and costumes, technical rehearsals and dress rehearsals
  • Ensures necessary equipment, props, performers and technical staff are on set when required
  • Manages health and safety issues
  • Selects, contracts, markets and arranges for the presentation and/or distribution of performance, visual and heritage arts.
Employment by region
Top 10 industries
for this job
IndustryJobs
Sport & recreation8,327
Arts & entertainment 7,502
Education4,445
Services to buildings4,039
Film & music 3,828
Employment activities3,629
Other personal service 3,303
Other professional3,191
Publishing activities2,813
Head offices, etc2,289
Employment status

Where to go next

Fancy winning a day with a TV production team? Enter our new Dream Jobs competition.An interview with Dishad HusainSector Skills Council for Creative MediaInformation and Statistics relating to the Media Sector

Explore other videos using the tag cloud

Stephen T

Dishad H Hi there. My name's Dishad. I'm a director and a cameraman and a writer of comedy films. I tend to find that I usually do the comedy just for my own personal, private work and then that most of my jobs come in for documentary, mainstream documentaries. When I was a kid, I started out thinking that I'd go into something science or technical, mainly because my mum wanted me to become a scientist or a doctor and so basically, those were the things I was thinking about when I was younger and what I geared myself towards when I went to university. In fact I did a science degree at university and that was mainly to keep the folks back home happy. Because no-one in my family has an artistic background or works in the media, I had no idea how you'd get into the media or how you'd get a job in the media. I didn't actually know anyone or talk to anyone regarding this, so it was completely something that was like a pipe dream. I spent most of my time at university in the student film and television society. I did my degree obviously and I did it quite well, thank you, mum, but luckily, all the things I did on the side sort of got me, or drew me towards my eventual media career. So I met someone at university who'd just been to film school and he was telling us about the joys of film school, and it was something that I hadn't actually considered because it's just, again, film school I wouldn't have known what that was about, what you could get out of it, and he had explained that it was a good way of getting into the career and you should apply. So luckily, because of entering competitions at student level, I was able to get into film school after university through my work that I had done as a student. My first job was great because the company I was working for allowed young people to do a lot of... take on a lot of responsibility. I got actually a lot of chance to work on shows by being a camera person, and that's quite rare but it was lucky that it was a great environment. It was a big step down, I think. I think as soon as...I was about to leave film school, it'd sort of given me loads of real, you know, encouragement and hoped to become, you know, a Hollywood superstar. But as soon as you left film school, you'd find out that you're sort of back on the lower rung again. So that was, yeah, it was an interesting sort of, yeah, falling on your feet. But yeah, sort of knowing that you're starting all over again. So this is Holly Bolly. It's a ten minute, short comedy that I funded myself. And it's basically...it took me one and a half years to make with all my own money and I took it round the festival...the film festival circuit and it did really well. I think it won eleven awards altogether and basically got me another directing job soon after with Channel Four. It's just something that, yeah, it's a labour of love that got me my next directing gig. Before this, I was mostly just doing sort of camera work, assistant producing work for other people just as a job and doing things that were really interesting but it wasn't something that I'd created or crafted myself. This gave me the confidence to go ahead and do my own projects. The best way of looking at it is, ‘it's the journey, not the destination’. So as long as I'm working, I'll be happy. It's not about the glamour and the glitz and the red carpets. It's nice if you get, you know, get there with the film festivals, but the main thing is just enjoying working. I love working even if it's making a low budget documentary. I love doing any work, so I'm just happy working, I think.

Embed Code

<!-- START YOUTUBE EMBED CODE --><div class="youtube_container"><iframe width="100%" height="490" id="youtube_iframe_lZkKJE3AxQ4" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/lZkKJE3AxQ4?showinfo=0&rel=0&wmode=transparent&autohide=1&autoplay=1" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></div><!-- END YOUTUBE EMBED CODE -->