Head of Department
London South Bank University

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Munir Morad is a Professor of Environmental Planning at London South Bank University. He did Geography. A junior lectureship in a smallish college in Wales confirmed his twin passions of teaching and research.

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£52,000
average salary
The UK average salary is £28,758
37
average weekly hours
There are 37.5 hours in the average working week
54%  male  46%  female 
The UK workforce is 47% female and 53% male

Future employment

Description

Higher education teaching professionals deliver lectures and teach students to at least first degree level, undertake research and write journal articles and books in their chosen field of study.

Qualifications

Entry will require a good honours first degree plus a higher degree or an equivalent professional qualification. For vocational subjects, practical experience and additional qualifications may also be required.

Tasks

  • Prepares, delivers and directs lectures, seminars and tutorials;
  • Prepares, administers and marks examinations, essays and other assignments;
  • Advises students on academic matters and encourages independent research;
  • Provides pastoral care or guidance to students;
  • Participates in decision making processes regarding curricula, budgetary, departmental and other matters;
  • Directs the work of postgraduate students;
  • Undertakes research, writes articles and books and attends conferences and other meetings.
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Head offices, etc 724
Architectural & related 504
Arts & entertainment 469
Office admin. 462
Other personal service 384
Employment status

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Professor Munir Morad

Munir Morad My name is Munir Morad. I am a professor of environmental planning at London South Bank University. I’m also the head of department of urban environment and leisure studies. As head of department, I manage the department’s affairs in terms of its resources, as well as student affairs, and staff development and so on. As a professor of environmental planning, I research that particular field and I’m expected to provide leadership. The reason I got involved in this is a desire to be involved in an area where there is hopefully some tangible consequences that could come out of that research agenda. I would like to think that as a child I was a perfectly normal child, mischievous at times, and that is the reason I brought with me this memento which is… reminds me of Toady in Wind in the Willows because I like to think that at least in my imagination some aspects of Toady’s character and adventures were close to the way I felt about the world. I grew up in the Middle East, and it was a… We lived in various parts of the Middle East as a family. There were some challenges that went with that upbringing. I probably did not go to the same school two years in succession, so it gives you an indication about how it panned out, my education. I was ambivalent as to what I wanted to do. I was never quite certain, but I do recall thinking of becoming a teacher, and I suppose that’s what I am now. I do recall thinking of becoming an actor, and took some interest in drama, but then I didn’t pursue it any further. I do recall the first time that one particular teacher thought and mentioned to me that I was much more able than I probably thought. It’s interesting once you get that sort of encouragement it does inspire you. It does spur you on. I do remember very well for the first time thinking that probably I ought to do a little bit more, to work a little bit harder, and I ought to look at possibilities about what I can do with my career. I studied geography. That was an area that I am very interested in. I noticed, much to my surprise, that my daughter has also opted to do geography at university. I don’t ever recall encouraging her to do this. I did what probably my parents did. They never asked me to consider becoming this profession, a member of this profession, or aspire to become this, but they always expect me to do well for myself, and that is exactly what I told my daughter, I hope. When I completed by PhD in London, I wasn’t entirely sure what I wanted to do, and an opportunity came up to take up a junior lectureship in a smallish college in Wales called Trinity College in Carmarthen. That opportunity was a turning point for me. Until that point, I wasn’t entirely certain what I wanted to do, but I think it provided me with confirmation that probably teaching and research were the two passions. You will not always achieve the exact objective, but something will come up, and it will be just as rewarding and just as fulfilling if you do not give up. I always maintain that, and it has served me very well, and I’m very grateful for that.  

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