Julie R - Service Delivery Manager

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Julie R

00:00:01 I manage the Admin team in the day surgery unit, and make sure that patients are booked and come in for their operations. I'm actually doing a secondment which is I’m away from my real job to gain more experience of managing teams and how the hospital works. I just like working in a hospital environment, because it feels like whatever you do you’re helping somebody else.

00:00:31 I left school at sixteen. I started a job as an office junior. You learnt so much about the organisation and how it worked, it was absolutely invaluable. Then I left to go and work at Acorn Computers, which was a horrible, horrible job. I was just sat in this corner of a room with all these people buzzing around everywhere – that is a big regret, that I left there and went to Acorn Computers.

00:01:04 I got a job at Leicester Royal Infirmary, it was just a little admin job, and that's where my career’s really taken off. I had one Service Manager, and he said why don’t you think about doing a degree? And I was like – I couldn’t possibly do a degree. When I was young you didn’t go to college, here I was, x amount of years later, and it was like – well I couldn’t do a degree. I really didn’t believe that I could do a degree. I went and found out how to enrol for a business degree, and I did it part time and still worked here. The first day I just wanted to run. There was somebody who come and spoke to us on that first day, who actually completely and utterly motivated me, and I thought I can do this, I just have to try. And I loved doing it, because it definitely changed the way – the way I think about things.

00:02:04 I had a knack for understanding databases and Excel. They had an Information Officer job, which was about building a database to track all the transplant patients. Then I did that for two years. A job came up in Information Services that I applied for and I got. I was monitoring waiting lists, making sure that we meet all the Government targets. Once I got there, I thought I’d be really really happy and that would be it for the rest of my career. I've been there five years now, and it’s like what do I want to do, where do I want to go? So the secondment that I'm doing now is about whether I want to stay in Information or move on.

00:02:49 There have been two or three people that have influenced me. One was the service manager that encouraged me to do my degree, and made me kind of believe in myself. The Manager before the Manager that I've got now, she's always said, ever since I've worked with her, that everybody else believes in me, but I possibly don’t believe in myself, and she's made me try to overcome that and believe in my ability. I truly believe that if you come and work in the NHS, if you show initiative, and they know you’re going to work hard, it is an excellent place to work, because I started as and Admin Assistant and now I'm a Junior Service Delivery Manager. If you take the opportunities you can work your way up the ladder. I could be anything I wanted to be, I think, as long as I had the encouragement, and other people believed in me, which helps me believe in myself.

00:03:50 ENDS

Julie R

Julie R I manage the Admin team in the day surgery unit, and make sure that patients are booked and come in for their operations. I'm actually doing a secondment which is I’m away from my real job to gain more experience of managing teams and how the hospital works. I just like working in a hospital environment, because it feels like whatever you do you’re helping somebody else. I left school at sixteen. I started a job as an office junior. You learnt so much about the organisation and how it worked, it was absolutely invaluable. Then I left to go and work at Acorn Computers, which was a horrible, horrible job. I was just sat in this corner of a room with all these people buzzing around everywhere – that is a big regret, that I left there and went to Acorn Computers. I got a job at Leicester Royal Infirmary, it was just a little admin job, and that's where my career’s really taken off. I had one Service Manager, and he said why don’t you think about doing a degree? And I was like – I couldn’t possibly do a degree. When I was young you didn’t go to college, here I was, x amount of years later, and it was like – well I couldn’t do a degree. I really didn’t believe that I could do a degree. I went and found out how to enrol for a business degree, and I did it part time and still worked here. The first day I just wanted to run. There was somebody who come and spoke to us on that first day, who actually completely and utterly motivated me, and I thought I can do this, I just have to try. And I loved doing it, because it definitely changed the way – the way I think about things. I had a knack for understanding databases and Excel. They had an Information Officer job, which was about building a database to track all the transplant patients. Then I did that for two years. A job came up in Information Services that I applied for and I got. I was monitoring waiting lists, making sure that we meet all the Government targets. Once I got there, I thought I’d be really really happy and that would be it for the rest of my career. I've been there five years now, and it’s like what do I want to do, where do I want to go? So the secondment that I'm doing now is about whether I want to stay in Information or move on. There have been two or three people that have influenced me. One was the service manager that encouraged me to do my degree, and made me kind of believe in myself. The Manager before the Manager that I've got now, she's always said, ever since I've worked with her, that everybody else believes in me, but I possibly don’t believe in myself, and she's made me try to overcome that and believe in my ability. I truly believe that if you come and work in the NHS, if you show initiative, and they know you’re going to work hard, it is an excellent place to work, because I started as and Admin Assistant and now I'm a Junior Service Delivery Manager. If you take the opportunities you can work your way up the ladder. I could be anything I wanted to be, I think, as long as I had the encouragement, and other people believed in me, which helps me believe in myself. ENDS

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About Julie R

Age at filming: Not stated, Employer's name: Addenbrookes Hospital
Julie R left school at 16, and tried a couple of jobs before finding the NHS. When it was suggested to her that she could do a degree her first response "I was like - I couldn't possibly do a degree." Now, however, she believes "I could be anything I wanted to be."

More information about health services and public health managers and directors

Check out 15 videos about this career


Average Salary
£54,600
Average Weekly Hours
40
Past Unemployment
YearUnemployed
20112%
20122%
Predicted Employment
Future Employment Chart
Top 10 Industries
For This Job
IndustryJobs
Retail trade6,900
Wholesale trade5,661
Specialised construction 2,942
Head offices, etc2,701
Public admin. & defence2,571
Auxiliary  services2,566
Health 2,482
Computer programming, etc2,224
Financial services1,903
Architectural & related1,767
Employment Status
Employment Status Chart
Description

Managers and directors in this unit group plan, organise, direct and co-ordinate the resources and activities of health care providers and purchasers at both district and unit levels.

Qualifications

Entrants require a degree or equivalent qualification, a professional qualification and/or relevant experience. Off- and on-the-job training is provided through management training schemes. The nature of schemes varies between regions and occupational areas.

Tasks
  • Implements policies of the board, ensures statutory procedures are followed, with particular emphasis on patient safety and the management of risk
  • Liaises with health care professionals to determine short and long-term needs and how to meet these objectives within budgetary constraints
  • Oversees the day-to-day management of the unit or service and provides leadership to staff
  • Uses statistical information to monitor performance and assist with planning
  • Negotiates and manages contracts with providers and purchasers of health care services
  • Manages staff, including recruitment, appraisal and development
  • Monitors and reports upon the effectiveness of services with a view to improving the efficiency of health care provision
  • Coordinates the promotion of public health and wellbeing in the actions and policies of public agencies and their social partners
  • Monitors and reports upon the state of public health and wellbeing.
Employment by Region
Regional Employment Chart
Gender Balance
M 68% 32% F
Skills Chart
Where to go next
Cambridge University Hospitals Sector Skills Council for Health Professionals

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