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Ranger - Community
Forestry Commission

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Sandy P

0:00:02 Hi! I’m Sandy P and I’m the waterside community ranger and I was employed basically due to increasing pressures on the eastern edge of the New Forest, along the waterside edge from anti-social behaviour issues but also due to the growing demand from the local population for things to do over on the waterside.

00:00:26 My job specifically kind of looks at outreach work. If there’s a youth club on in certain housing estates, I go out and work with young people. I do a lot with underage drinking and drug taking and it’s kind of going out to the different user groups and explaining to them why it may not be so good, but also then saying, ‘right, who wants to get involved with different tasks?’. So I’ll do conservation tasks with young people.

00:00:54 You do have to be quite strong-minded. You have to have a quite strong personality and at times be quite thick-skinned, because, at the end of the day, if you’re dealing with anti-social behaviour issues, you might get a little bit of abuse back. But remembering at the end of the day what your ultimate aim is, you’re there because you’re trying to help these individuals. You’re not there to try and prosecute anybody and everybody, you’re there to try and explain. Because a lot of the time they don’t really know and that kind of gives you that incentive to carry on.

00:01:26 I did a degree in wildlife management and it was always a case of I wanted to work outdoors. I loved working with different people and explaining to them about wildlife but always assumed that I’d go down the road of being a wildlife ranger or something of that kind of nature. But what I did when I first finished my degree is I worked as an education coordinator at an activity centre and while I was doing that I worked with a lot of different groups. Special needs, severe behaviour problems.

00:02:00 And this post came up and I thought, ‘oh, well I’ll give it a go’ because I was…I knew a little bit about the area and I knew the problems and I thought, ‘well, if you want to try and protect an area, why not deal with the main problem in the first place?’ and that was that people are often the biggest problems to any kind of conservation issues. And if people don’t know and there’s nobody out there willing to teach them, then you’re never going to change it. So I thought, ‘I grew up here. I enjoyed it. Why not go out and explain to a lot more?’

00:02:36 I work with young mums, younger teenagers and even young kids, and being able to go in there and almost act like a best friend in some ways, you’ve got that kind of respect because they see you as a friend, not just somebody that’s in a green uniform that tells us what to do and what not to do, you’re seen as a friend. And then some occasions, you kind of get them actually confiding in you.

00:03:03 You actually half end up being kind of like a social worker. An ear for listening to different problems and nine times out of ten in my job I find that it’s not because people want to cause problems or cause harm, it’s because they don’t understand what they’re doing is causing a problem. You explain the potential problems that you might have and then of course you get those messages across. But there are a lot more problems than I think people realise.

ENDS

Sandy P is a Waterside Community Ranger. She says "if you want to try and protect an area, why not deal with the main problem in the first place? People are often the biggest problems to any kind of conservation issues... So I'll do conservation tasks with young people."

More information about Managers and proprietors in forestry, fishing and related services

Data powered by LMI For All
£30,680
average salary

The UK average salary is £28,758

46
average weekly hours

There are 37.5 hours in the average working week

61%  female  39%  male 

The UK workforce is 47% female and 53% male

Future employment

Description

Managers and proprietors in this unit group plan, organise and co-ordinate the activities and resources of forestry, fishing, animal husbandry and related operations and establishments.

Qualifications

Whilst no formal qualifications are required for proprietors in this area, forestry managers usually require a degree or equivalent qualification in forestry and prior relevant work experience. BTEC qualifications in fish farm management are available. Skippers of offshore fishing vessels require prior work experience and must undertake basic safety training by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency. Apprenticeships are available in some areas. Minimum age limits may apply in some areas of employment.

Tasks

  • Determines financial, staffing and other short- and long-term needs;
  • Manages and trains staff;
  • Decides, or advises on, type of animal to be bred and/or trained, and selects, buys and trains animals accordingly;
  • Plans and directs the establishment and maintenance of forest /woodland areas and regularly inspects forest work;
  • Liaises with neighbouring landowners, contractors and local authorities;
  • Oversees facilities such as visitor centres, nature trails, footpaths, etc.;
  • Selects suitable breeding grounds for shellfish, sea and freshwater fish and purchases stock;
  • Arranges rearing and feeding and ensures health of fish stocks;
  • Oversees maintenance of equipment and fish habitats;
  • Plans fishing voyages, maintains vessel/s and equipment and oversees operational safety;
  • Arranges for sale of catch, liaises with onshore agents;
  • Ensures observance of maritime laws and international fishing regulations.
Employment by region
Top 10 industries for this job
Sport & recreation 3365
Agriculture, etc 2190
Education 2102
Services to buildings 2059
Other personal service 1708
Employment status